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Posted by Kathy Smyser on Dec 1, 2015 4:14:00 PM

Portrait by Heather Hoh

John Singer Sargent (January 12, 1856 – April 14, 1925) was an American portrait painter who portrayed the luxury of the late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century society. During his prolific career, he created roughly 900 oil paintings and more than 2,000 watercolors, as well as numerous sketches and charcoal drawings.

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Posted by Kathy Smyser on Nov 11, 2015 4:15:39 PM

Portrait by Cassie Tarr

Edward Hopper (July 22, 1882 – May 15, 1967) was a prominent American realist painter. While known primarily for his oil paintings, he was also a watercolorist and printmaker. Hopper derived his subject matter from two primary sources: one, the common features of American life (gas stations, motels, restaurants, theaters, railroads, and street scenes) and its inhabitants; and two, seascapes and rural landscapes.

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Posted by Kathy Smyser on Nov 2, 2015 4:28:55 PM

Portrait by Jacob Peck

Dave Rapoza is a self-taught illustrator from Boston, MA, and freelancer since 2006. According to his website, he studied Andrew Loomis's and Bridgman’s figure drawing books and practiced by making numerous drawings from direct observation, often of items from on desk.

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Posted by Kathy Smyser on Oct 26, 2015 4:32:22 PM

Roy Lichtenstein Portrait by Seth Elberg

Roy Lichtenstein, one of the most familiar names in American pop art, using a style borrowing from comic strips to create works that portrayed the culture of contemporary life. Using bright, vibrant colors and printing techniques he translated themes about consumerism through references to famous and historical works of art.

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Posted by Kathy Smyser on Oct 19, 2015 4:00:00 AM

Jackson Pollock portrait by Heather Hoh

Jackson Pollock (1912-1956), an American painter from Wyoming and pioneer of the Abstract Expressionist movement.

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Posted by Kathy Smyser on Oct 13, 2015 4:30:00 PM

 

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Posted by Kathy Smyser on Oct 5, 2015 4:30:00 PM

 

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Posted by Kathy Smyser on Sep 28, 2015 3:40:00 PM

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Posted by Kathy Smyser on Sep 22, 2015 10:51:13 AM

Velázquez portrait by Lisandro Gonzalez

Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (June 6, 1599 – August 6, 1660) was a Spanish painter who was one of the most important painters of the Spanish Golden Age. As a child in Seville, he showed early artistic promise and at the age of 11, he began study under Francisco de Herrera. Within a year, he apprenticed with Francisco Pacheco and remained there for five years.

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Posted by Kathy Smyser on Sep 14, 2015 5:00:00 PM

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Toulouse-Lautrec portrait by Samantha Howell

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (November 24, 1864 – September 9, 1901) began drawing at a young age, at the family estate in Albi in southern France, when illness and injury kept him unable to participate in the typical activities of the era’s gentry. His disproportionately short legs, in comparison to his torso, were caused by a poorly healing broken legs, the result of a genetic defect. A family friend who painted the fashionable sporting pictures, was engaged as his first art teacher.

His physical handicap influenced his outlook on life, leading to a lifestyle which included alcohol abuse, which eventually killed him, and a sympathy and affection for those marginalized in society, such as the prostitutes who became models for many of his famous works.

Bohemian lifestyle in Montmarte

In 1882, he moved to Paris, and following a period of painting en plein air following techniques of the Impressionists, he began to explore modern techniques in printmaking. Settling in Montmarte, the Parisian area known as the home to artists and writers. There he created art that mirrored his bohemian life. He met and exhibited with Émile Bernard and Vincent van Gogh.

He became one of Paris’s foremost printmakers, focusing on the subject of the city’s burgeoning night life and helped to expand the popularity of the advertising lithograph. When the cabaret Moulin Rouge opened, he was commissioned to paint a series of advertising posters, as well as posters promoting famous nightclub singers. He traveled to London, where he befriended Oscar Wilde.

Japanese influence

He was influenced by Japanese woodblock prints which featured strong outlines and bold flat colors. Through his prints, he sharply depicted the personality traits of the day’s performers as well as sympathetically portraying the humanity of prostitutes.

By 1899, Toulouse-Lautrec collapsed from exhaustion and the effects of his alcoholism. His family had him committed to sanatorium for three months where he drew 39 circus portraits. After leaving his treatment, Toulouse-Lautrec returned to Paris to paint, but his health continued to decline. On September 9, 1901, he died at the family estate, Château Malromé, in Saint-André-du-Bois at age 36.

Portrait of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec by Samantha Howell.



Each week on the Pennsylvania College of Art & Design blog, a different profile of an artist is posted. These are taken from a classroom project where the illustration and fine art students create “Artist Trading Cards,” first researching the facts about and the style of a selected artist, then making a trading card that captures the spirit of the artist.

Download:  You Don’t Choose Art. It Chooses You.

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Topics: Artist Spotlight